• Explain to your child that they should post only information they are comfortable with anyone else seeing or knowing, including parents, grandparents and teachers. Remind them not to post/send anything that could put them in danger or embarrass them later in life. Many employers now check online for information about potential employees.
  • Explain that once they send an image to someone else or post it online, they can't take it back. It can be saved by others or in the Internet indefinitely.
  • Make sure children are aware that their information can be copied by people or posted in other sites that they may not be aware of and can't remove by themselves.
  • Help your child to think about how to keep control of the information they want to post online or share with others Discuss the concept of trust and how relationships can change with time.
  • Discuss with your child that not everyone their age is sexting. The National Survey of Australian Secondary Students and Sexual Health (Mitchell, Patrick, Heywood, Blackman & Pitts, 2014) used a representative sample of over 2000 students in years 10, 11 and 12 and reported that over half of the students had received a sexually explicit message, and one-quarter had sent a sexually explicit photo of themselves.
  • Discuss the legal, ethical and moral implications of forwarding or sharing images received by others that were not intended to be shared. read more
  • Discuss with your child the legal implications of inappropriate behaviour. Explain the importance of behaving responsibly and of protecting their and their friends' images and digital reputations. These videos by ThinkUKnow (UK) provide parents with useful information about talking to your child about sexting.